Why do viruses like the coronavirus sometimes steal our sense of smell?

When you catch a severe cold, your nose stuffs up, you can’t smell anything and food tastes funny. Fortunately, most people regain their sense of smell once the cold runs its course. But for others, the complete (anosmia) or partial (hyposmia) loss of the sense of smell is permanent.

I spoke with Zara Patel, MD, a Stanford associate professor of otolaryngology, head and neck surgery, and director of endoscopic skull base surgery, to learn more about her research on olfactory disorders. In particular, we discussed her recent study on the possible association between post-viral olfactory loss and other cranial neuropathies, which are disorders that impair your nerves and ultimately your ability to feel or move. She also described how her work pertains to the COVID-19 pandemic.  

How does a virus impair someone’s sense of smell?

A variety of viruses can attack the cranial nerves related to smell or the mucosal tissue that surrounds those nerves. Cranial nerves control things in our head and neck — such as the nerves that allow us to speak by using our vocal cords, control our facial motion, hear and smell.

For example, COVID-19 is just one type of disease caused by a coronavirus. There are many other types of coronaviruses that cause colds and upper respiratory illnesses, as well as rhinoviruses and influenza viruses. Any of these viruses are known to cause inflammation, either directly around the nerve in the nasal lining or within the nerve itself. When the nerve is either surrounded by inflammatory molecules or has a lot of inflammation within the nerve cell body, it cannot function correctly — and that is what causes the loss or dysfunction of smell. And it can happen to anyone: young and old, healthy and sick.

How did your study investigate olfactory loss?

In my practice, I see patients who have smell dysfunction. But I’m also a sinus and skull base surgeon, so I have a whole host of other patients with sinus problems and skull-based tumors who don’t have an olfactory loss. So we did a case-control study to compare the incidence of cranial neuropathies — conditions in which nerves in the brain or brain stem are damaged — in two patient groups. Ninety-one patients had post-viral olfactory loss and 100 were controls; and they were matched as closely as possible for age and gender.

We also looked at family history of neurologic diseases — such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and stroke.

What did you find?

Patients with post-viral olfactory loss had six-times higher odds of having other cranial neuropathies than the control group — with an incidence rate of other cranial nerve deficits of 11% and 2%, respectively. Family history of neurologic diseases was associated with more than two-fold greater odds of having a cranial nerve deficit. Although we had a small sample size, the striking difference between the groups implies that it is worthwhile to research this with a larger population.

Our findings suggest that patients experiencing these pathologies may have inherent vulnerabilities to neural damage or decreased ability of nerve recovery — something beyond known risk factors like age, body mass index, co-morbidities and the duration of the loss before intervention. For example, there may be a genetic predisposition, but that is just an untested theory at this point.

How does this work pertain to COVID-19?

Smell loss can be one of the earliest signs of a COVID-19 infection. It can sometimes be the only sign. Or it can present after other symptoms. Although it may not affect every patient with COVID-19, loss of smell and taste is definitely associated with the disease. In some countries, including France, they’ve used this as a triage mechanism. People need to know that these symptoms can be related to the COVID-19 disease process so they aren’t going about their lives like normal and spreading the virus.

The pandemic also might impact how we treat patients with olfactory dysfunction in general. When someone has a viral-induced inflammation of the nerve, we sometimes treat it with steroids to decrease the inflammation. But treating COVID-19 patients with steroids might be a bad idea because of its effect on the inflammatory processes going on in their heart and lungs.

What advice do you have for people who have an impaired sense of smell?  

First, if you lose your sense of smell and it isn’t coming back after all the other symptoms have gone away, seek care as soon as possible. If you wait too long, there is much less that we can do to help you. Interventions, including olfactory training and medications, are more effective when you are treated early.

Second, if you lose your sense of smell or taste during this pandemic and you don’t have any other symptoms, contact your doctor. The doctor can decide whether you need to be tested for COVID-19 or whether you need to self-isolate to avoid being a vector of the virus in your family or community.

Image by carles

This is a reposting of my Scope story, courtesy of Stanford School of Medicine.

Unable to smell? One Stanford researcher is working to improve therapies

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Photo by PublicDomainPictures

I don’t often think about my sense of smell, unless I’m given a fragrant flower or walk past someone smoking. But the ability to smell is both critical and underappreciated, according to Zara Patel, MD, a Stanford assistant professor of otolaryngology, head and neck surgery.

A smell begins when a molecule — say, from a flower — stimulates the olfactory nerve cells found high up in the nose. These nerve cells then send information to the brain, where the specific smell is identified. Anything that interferes with these processes, such as nasal congestion or damage to the nerve cells, can lead to a loss of smell.

I recently spoke with Patel about the loss of the sense of smell, a condition known as anosmia.

How does losing the sense of smell impact patients?

“If asked which sense they’d give up first, most people would likely choose their sense of smell. It’s only after the loss of olfaction that its significant impact on our lives is appreciated. Our sense of smell plays a key role in a vast array of basic human interactions, such as what attracts us to sexual partners, what keeps us in committed relationships and how maternal bonding occurs with newborns. It’s also one of our most basic protective mechanisms that allows us to wake up in the midst of a fire and prevents us from eating spoiled food. And importantly — keeping in mind that our ability to taste is highly dependent on our ability to smell — the inability to enjoy food and related social activities often causes social isolation, depression and malnutrition.”

What causes olfactory loss?

“There are over 100 reasons why people can lose their sense of smell. However, the majority of people lose it from sinonasal inflammatory disease, post-viral infections, traumas or tumors. Unfortunately, olfactory loss is often of “idiopathic” origin, meaning we just don’t know what caused it. That is why research in this area is so important.

It’s also important to be treated as early as possible. It is always frustrating to see someone who lost their sense of smell over a year ago, but they weren’t referred to me at the time or were told that nothing could be done. Those are missed opportunities that will negatively impact those patients for the rest of their lives.”

How do you treat patients who can no longer smell?

“The treatment really depends on the reason for loss, and may include surgery or medications. For those who lose the ability to smell after trauma, post-viral infection or when we don’t know why it happened, olfactory training can be used, which is a very simple protocol that patients can do at home. The patients smell several essentials oils in a structured way twice a day, every day, over a long period of time. The oils — rose, eucalyptus, clove and lemon —stimulate different types of olfactory receptor cells in the nose. Although it does not help everyone, it has been shown to be effective in 30 to 50 percent of patients, across multiple origins of loss.

We don’t have an exact understanding of how and why it works. However, a study using functional MRI observed a change in how the brain responds to odors before and after olfactory training. Before the training, there was a chaotic array of random areas lighting up in the brain. After the training, the images showed a renewed pathway to the olfaction center in the brain. We also know that the olfactory nerve has an inherent ability to regenerate. We’re trying to take advantage of this fact and ‘switch on’ those regenerative cells.

I have many patients who have benefited from olfactory training, including some who need their sense of smell for their livelihood — such as chefs or wilderness guides. Being able to get that sense back has allowed them to continue doing what they’re passionate about and has increased their quality of life.”

What are you working on now?

“Although olfactory training has allowed us to help more patients, 30 to 50 percent improvement is still quite low and certainly not the final answer. That’s why the research I’m currently doing has me excited about the potential of using both stem cells and neurostimulation to advance this field. I hope to soon be able to offer alternative interventions to these patients.”

This is a reposting of my Scope blog story, courtesy of Stanford School of Medicine.